Posted in The garden

Vignettes of the garden–one year in pictures

Through the window--August 2014
Through the window–August 2014
A view of the garden: September 2014.
A view of the garden: September 2014.

One of the wonderful things about a garden is watching it change over the seasons. On the right is the champa tree that grew in a pot on my terrace in Delhi. I tried to bring some plants with me when I moved to Dehradun, not because they were rare or unavailable, but because left on the hot terrace they may die. I was particularly fond of this champa, and it managed the journey in a truck, and has grown bigger here.

October 2014
October 2014

There was rain and hail covered the lawn in October 2014.

November 2014
November 2014

In November the marigolds glowed like lights in the twilight.

December 2014
December 2014

The marigolds continued to bloom in December, along with button chrysanthemums.

January 2015
January 2015

A new year had begun, and  passion flowers bloomed on the wall.

February 2015
February 2015

Though it was still cold there were quite a few flowers in February, including roses and pansies.

March 2015
March 2015

In March the Iris were flowering.

April 2015
April 2015

In April the garden was full of flowers of all kinds.

May 2015
May 2015

The garden continued to be in full bloom in May.

June 2015
June 2015

There were not that many flowers in June. It was time to go to the nursery and plant some seedlings.

July 2015
July 2015

As the monsoon broke, the plants were drowned in rain. At the back of the house, the rain-fed Bindal river began to flow.

The garden changed with the seasons–one year had passed.

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Author:

A writer with eight published books and several articles, book reviews etc. I primarily write on history and religion, but would love to switch to fiction.

16 thoughts on “Vignettes of the garden–one year in pictures

  1. Do your passion vines bear fruit? We have two sorts of passion fruit here in New Zealand. One fruit is roundish, purple in colour, and wrinkly when it is fully ripe. The other is called “banana passion fruit” because the fruit is elongated like a teardrop and yellow. I had one growing in my yard. I got a letter from the Regional Council telling me to destroy it, because banana passion fruit have the capacity to invade and destroy native bush. So I did. But I wish the Regional Council was as good as managing the land directly under their control as they expect me to be in my small garden!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. These are referred to as passion flowers, but I’ve not had fruit yet–interesting to know how things happen in different countries, and how the Regional Council can ask you to destroy something! My vine is spreading, but not as much as the ivy on the other side of the wall.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Ivy can be a nightmare here. Introduced (like so many other things) by the British settlers in search of familiarity. The slightly milder climate causes it to go mad, and it’s nigh on indestructible. I’m constantly launching myself at the ivy that grows around my place. By comparison, my passion vine was very well-behaved.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. The ivy looks indestructible here too–it doesn’t mind what the climate is. I actually like it, love the look of it, but I have been told it won’t allow anything else to grow and destroys the wall as well.

        Liked by 2 people

  2. Living in New England, we do not have many flowers during the winter months when it is cold. But our spring rebirth is quite enticing. I loved the seasonal photos and have been inspired to do a similar post some day. Thank you. Clare

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Wishing you a wonderful week. I always feel that the people I blog with are nearer to me then they really are. I’ve been up since 5 AM but now it’s 7AM and i think I might get back to sleep. Happy dreams to you..Clare

        Like

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